Cattails, Bill Domonkos, 2015 (Photo: Mug Shot from the 1930’s, Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums)

Cattails by Bill Domonkos, 2015 (Photo: Mug Shot from the 1930’s, Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums)

I want a poem that threatens the reader with psychic damage the way that a 45 auto could take out the eyes. I want a poem to be so dangerous that just the simple reading of it could take you right to the existential brink of whoever or whatever you are or could ever hope to be. I want a book of poetry to be as lethal as a razor to the jugular. This time a nick, the next a slash. I want to see a book of Outlaw Poetry to be so dangerous it might bear this warning: Reading this book could be dangerous to your mental health. 

Todd Moore (14 November 1937 – 12 March 2010)

The outlaw poet is identified by at first being marginal, out on the side, separate, in order to create one’s own universe. Then, through this individuality and independence, through this working out one’s own belief system, incorporating ideas from a number of sources, the outlaw poet reaches a universality of ideas and feelings. The best communication is outlaw to outlaw, individual to individual, universe to universe. Outlaw is an alternate way of living. It’s not for everyone. It’s for folks who are obsessed by following one’s own way and creating a whole interior universe. It’s wild. It’s dangerous. It’s revolutionary. It’s about not accepting anything that is not proven through your own experience. It challenges everything. At the same time, it accepts everything, as one’s own.

Tony Moffeit

Listen to Tony Moffeit | give me the night

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Equus by Bill Domonkos, 2013